Jan
20
3:00 PM15:00

Patrick Hemmerlé (piano)

St Mary’s Church, Hay-on-Wye

Tickets £12 (students £6)


Tickets in person from Richard Booth's Bookshop, 44 Lion Street, Hay-on-Wye

or by telephone: 01497 820322

or online through Booth's Bookshop

or at the door

Please note:  time given for end of concert is approximate.

Patrick-Hemmerle-LO.jpg


It seems so ironic - one of the supreme masterworks of music, which has enthralled legions of scholars and performers for ages, was meant to put its first audience to sleep!

The so-called Goldberg Variations of Johann Sebastian Bach (1685 - 1750) is believed to have been a gift to a Count Kayserling, an influential musical devotee who had secured for Bach an appointment as official composer to the Saxon court. Beyond being a deep honour, the title provided Bach much-needed royal protection against the pettiness of his employers, with whom he rarely got along. From his earliest days as a church organist, Bach was faulted for confusing congregations with flights of invention rather than strictly accompanying their hymns.

The Count suffered from bouts of insomnia and had hired one of Bach's pupils, the fourteen year old Johann Gottlieb Goldberg, to play for him during his restless nights. To soothe the Count, Bach wrote this piece, formally entitled Aria with Diverse Variations for Harpsichord with Two Manuals, in 1741. In gratitude, the Count sent Bach 100 louis d'or, a sum far exceeding his annual salary.

Bach's Goldberg Variations is often considered the purest expression of his creativity. But perhaps the ultimate display of the full range of Bach's art, as well as the outlet for his deepest, most personal feelings is the Goldberg Variations.

Chopin's 24 Preludes, Op 28, are a set of short pieces for the piano, one in each of the twenty-four keys, originally published in 1839. Chopin wrote them between 1835 and 1839, partly in Majorca, where he spent the winter of 1838–39 and where he had fled with George Sand and her children to escape the damp Paris weather. In Majorca, Chopin had a copy of Bach's The Well-Tempered Clavier, and as in each of Bach's two sets of preludes and fugues, his Op 28 set comprises a complete cycle of the major and minor keys, albeit with a different ordering. 

Whereas the term ‘prelude’ had hitherto been used to describe an introductory piece, Chopin's pieces stand as self-contained units, each conveying a specific idea or emotion.

Patrick Hemmerlé is a French pianist based in Cambridge, UK. He performs regularly as a soloist and chamber musician. His repertoire is large with different areas of focus: a large part is devoted to Bach in particular and the great composers from the Austro-German tradition. Patrick is also interested in performing composers who have remained on the fringe of the main repertoire. He therefore regularly includes in his concert programmes composers such as Novak, Martin, Emmanuel, Roger-Ducasse and many others, alongside more familiar names. 

Patrick has released two CDs with works by Schumann, Brahms, Novak, and Tchesnokov. He was originally trained in Paris, where he studied in the Conservatoire à Rayonnement Régional de Paris with Billy Eidi and also had lessons with Nadine Wright, Joaquin Soriano, Ventislav Yankov, and Eric Heidsieck. He is laureate of the international competitions of Valencia, Toledo, Grosseto, Epinal, and CFRPM in Paris.

Refreshments available during the interval

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Feb
8
7:30 PM19:30

Robin Michael (cello)

Richard Booth’s Bookshop, Hay-on-Wye

Tickets: £12 (Students £6)

Please note:  time given for end of concert is approximate.

Tickets in person from Richard Booth's Bookshop, 44 Lion Street, Hay-on-Wye

or by telephone: 01497 820322

or online through Booth's Bookshop

or at the door if seats still available

Please note:  time given for end of concert is approximate.

Robin Michael 2.jpg


The Six Cello Suites for Unaccompanied Cello by Johann Sebastian Bach are some of the most frequently performed and recognizable solo compositions ever written for the cello. Bach most likely composed them during the period 1717–23, when he served as Kapellmeister in Köthen. The title given on the cover of the Anna Magdalena Bach manuscript was Suites à Violoncello Solo senza Basso (Suites for cello solo without bass). These suites are remarkable in that they achieve the effect of implied three- to four-voice music in a single musical line.

As is usual in a Baroque musical suite, after the prelude which begins each suite, all the other movements are based around Baroque dance types; the cello suites are structured in six movements each: prelude, allemande, courante, sarabande, two minuets or two bourées or two gavottes, and a final gigue. The Bach cello suites are considered to be among the most profound of all classical music works. Wilfrid Mellers described them in 1980 as "Monophonic music wherein a man has created a dance of God."


The Hungarian composer Zoltán Kodály wrote his Sonata in B minor for Solo Cello, Op. 8, in 1915. It was first performed in 1918 and published in 1921. It is among the most significant works for solo cello written since J S Bach’s Cello Suites. It contains influences of Debussy and Bartók, as well as the inflections and nuances of Hungarian folk music.

 

Robin Michael studied at the Royal Academy of Music with David Strange and Colin Carr and later with Ferenc Rados. He is principal cellist in Orchestre Revolutionnaire et Romantique, Solo cellist with Orchestre Les Siècles (Paris) as well as regular guest principal cellist with the Australian Chamber Orchestra, Scottish Chamber Orchestra, BBC National Orchestra of Wales, Royal Northern Sinfonia, Irish Chamber Orchestra, Britten Sinfonia, RTE Concert Orchestra, English Baroque Soloists, English National Opera and Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment.

Robin was the cellist in the Fidelio Trio for over 10 years with which he toured Europe, North America, Asia and South Africa. He has also appeared in collaboration with the Dante and Eroica Quartets. Highlights in his discography include the premier recording of Joe Cutler's cello concerto with the BBC Concert Orchestra (NMC), first recording of the original version of Mendelssohn's Octet on period instruments (Resonus) and Fidelio Trio recordings on Naxos, NMC, Métier and Delphian records.

Recent concert highlights include complete Bach and Britten suite cycles in France and London, the South Korean premier of Jonathan Harvey's 'Advaya' for cello and electronics, both Haydn concertos at the Spier festival in South Africa as well as festival appearances in Buenos Aires, Library of Congress, Washington, and European festivals including Cheltenham, Aldeburgh and St Magnus. 

Recent projects include a recording of the Brahms sonatas with Daniel Tong, a Bach suite cycle at the St Magnus Festival, Britten suite cycle at Festival 'Phil Grobi' in the Auvergne and the first Kinnordy Chamber Music Festival in Scotland where he is co-artistic director with Daniel Tong.

Robin plays on a cello made for him by the German Luthier Stephan von Behr, 2010.

Liquid refreshments available

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Mar
17
3:00 PM15:00

Milly Forrest (soprano) and Joseph Ramadan (piano)

St Mary’s Church, Hay-on-Wye

Tickets: £12 (Students £6)

Please note:  time given for end of concert is approximate.

Tickets in person from Richard Booth's Bookshop, 44 Lion Street, Hay-on-Wye

or by telephone: 01497 820322

or online through Booth's Bookshop

or at the door

Please note:  time given for end of concert is approximate.

Milly Forrest.jpg

Programme

Songs from Germany:

Richard Strauss, Op29:  Drei Lieder:

Traum durch die Dammerung

Shlagende Herzen

Nachtgang

 

Songs from Italy:

Rossini:  La Danza

Bellini:  Vaga luna

Bellini:  Ma rendi pur contento

 

Opera arias:

Puccini: Quando m’en vo - La Boheme

Mozart: Se il padre perdei - Idomeneo

Handel: Mio Caro bene

Lewis Murphy and Laura Attridge:  Skin - Story of the Little Mermaid (2015)

Herbert Howells:  King David




Songs and Opera from England:

Britten:  How beautiful it is - Governess’ aria - The Turn of the Screw

Britten: Folk song arrangement:  The trees they grow so high

Herbert Howells:  King David

Frank Bridge:  Love went ariding

Vaughan Williams:  Orpheus with his lute

Gilbert and Sullivan:  The hours creep on apace - HMS Pinafore

  

After completing her undergraduate degree at the Royal Academy of Music under the tuition of Kathleen Livingstone, lyric soprano Milly Forrest is currently working towards her masters at the Royal College of Music where she studies with Alison Wells.  On the operatic stage Milly has sung the roles of Barbarina - Le Nozze di Figaro (Royal College Opera School), Miranda - The Enchanted Island (British Youth Opera), Susanna - Le Nozze di Figaro (London Young Sinfonia), Clorinda - La Cenerentola (London Young Sinfonia), Fiordiligi - Cosi fan tutte (London Young Sinfonia) and Amore - L’incoronazione di Poppea (Royal Academy Opera).  In opera scenes at the RAM and RCM Milly has worked on Adina - L’elisir d’amore (Donizetti), Ilia - Idomeneo (Mozart), Cricket Ghost - Pinocchio (Jonathan Dove), Rodelinda (Handel) and Nanetta - Falstaff (Verdi).

Highlights of the last year include working on the role of Miranda in Jeremy Sams’s ‘The Enchanted Island’ with British Youth Opera, winning the Brooks -van der Pump English song competition at the RCM, performing Exsultate Jubilate with the National Symphony Orchestra and playing the role of Barbarina in the RCM Opera School’s production of Le Nozze di Figaro directed by Sir Thomas Allen.  Milly regularly sings as a soloist with Nantwich Choral Society, Dartington Community Choir, Great Missenden Choral Society, Ipswich Choral Society and The Medici Choir.  In 2018 Milly also took part in a contemporary opera project at the RCM in partnership with Tête-à-tête Opera directed by Bill Bankes-Jones.  In July 2017, Milly was asked by John Gilhooly (director of the Wigmore Hall) to step in for the last song recital of the season ‘A serenade to Music’, accompanied by Graham Johnson and Eugene Asti.  She sang alongside Mary Bevan, Elizabeth Watts, Anna Huntley and many others and made the national headlines after impressing critics.  This summer Milly will be working for Garsington Opera Company on their Alvarez Young Artist programme.  In October Milly will be performing the role of Iris in the Shanghai Symphony Orchestra's production of Semele conducted by Yu Long and in 2020 she looks forward to covering the role of Barbarina in the ENO’s production of Le Nozze di Figaro.

Refreshments available during the interval

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Apr
10
7:30 PM19:30

Alice Earll (violin)

Booth’s Bookshop Cinema (entrance in Brook Street, Hay-on-Wye)

Please note:  time given for end of concert is approximate.

Alice Earll.jpg

‘Dancing with Bach’: D minor Partita and Chaconne with musical illustrations from Westhoff and Biber

JS Bach’s Sonatas and Partitas for Solo Violin are among the most exceptional pieces for unaccompanied violin and were modelled on some of the most popular dances of the baroque era. Find out about the dances Bach used, how he adapted them and the origins of his inimitable style. We will explore the history of the genre and discuss whether Bach’s composition was a singular work of genius or the pinnacle of a well-worn compositional path. Discover how composers such as Biber and Westhoff blazed the trail as much as half a century before Bach had written his collection and listen to their music all performed on an historical instrument. Join Alice for an evening of Bach, Westhoff and Biber and more with opportunities for discussion and drinks.

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May
1
7:30 PM19:30

The Crayford, Clemmow, Welsh Piano Trio

St Mary’s Church, Hay-on-Wye

Please note:  time given for end of concert is approximate.

Hay Music and St Mary’s Church in association present a Mayday Concert with The Crayford, Clemmow, Welsh Piano Trio

 

Caroline Clemmow - piano, Marcia Crawford - violin, Moray Welsh - cello


Programme

Haydn:  Trio in G major Hob XV:25 - ‘Gypsy Rondo'

Solo items for violin, piano and cello to be announced 

Piazzolla:  ‘Spring’ from The Four Seasons arr. Bragato

Dvorak:  ‘Dumky' Trio Op. 90

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Jun
23
3:00 PM15:00

Raphael Wallfisch (cello) and John York (piano)

Dorstone House, Dorstone

Please note:  time given for end of concert is approximate.

Tickets £15 (students £7.50)

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Programme

Rebecca Clarke:  Rhapsody for Cello and Piano (1923 - unpublished until now)

Beethoven:  Sonata in G minor Op 5 No 2

Brahms: Sonata in F minor Op 120 No 1

Frank Bridge:  Sonata in D minor (1917)

Hay Music is proud and honoured to present a recital by one of the world’s finest cellists, Raphael Wallfisch, together with his regular pianist John York.

Raphael is acknowledged as probably the leading British cellist for the last few decades with an extraordinary discography now numbering over 80 CDs encompassing the entire major cello repertoire in concerti and chamber music and individual cello works. In addition he has specialised in introducing less familiar pieces by 20th century British composers and others.

He comes from a musical family (and has sired another generation of musicians) with his father being the pianist Peter Wallfisch and his mother the cellist Anita Lasker-Wallfisch, an Auschwitz survivor who owed her survival to her membership of the orchestra of the infamous death camp. Over his 40 year career Raphael has performed with all the leading orchestras worldwide, and nearer home with the LPO. LSO, BBC Symphony, English Chamber, Halle, CBSO, and more. He has appeared in festivals throughout Britain and Europe including the BBC Proms, Edinburgh and Aldeburgh. He has worked with numerous British composers including Sir Peter Maxwell Davies, James MacMillan, John Tavener and Adrian Williams.

John York’s career was launched in 1973 when he was awarded the International Debussy prize in Paris. After a Wigmore Hall debut he has performed across the world as a soloist with many of the major orchestras as well as being a chamber music partner, primarily with Raphael Wallfisch and the piano duo York2. Apart from the Wallfisch/York CDs he has recorded the complete works for piano and winds of Poulenc, Saint-Saëns, Ravel and Debussy. He was, for 33 years, Professor at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama.

Their programme begins with the Rhapsody for Cello and Piano (1923) by Rebecca Clarke (1886-1979). This is no Edwardian late romantic trifle but a major four movement work of, at times, almost unbearable pain and anguish, never published until now. She withdrew the work during early rehearsal with May Mukle and Myra Hess, and the work was never performed in her lifetime. It is clearly programmatic with the opening funeral bell on the piano followed by a rising cry and then descending arpeggios on both cello and piano filling the intense soundscape alongside the single line cello. The first movement ends quietly. The second movement is marked adagio e molto calmato, with the sound of a tick-tock clock, and the piano filling out with exquisite form and harmony, whilst the whole movement remains tender yet painful. In the allegro third movement you hear a percussive piano and pizzicato cello. There are thrilling passages with a strong cello theme against piano arpeggios. At one point we can perhaps hear a railway journey. Without a break the movement segues into the final lento, more anguish, more bells, and a descent into a calmer more reflective ending. Why did she withdraw this wonderful composition? Maybe on hearing it in rehearsal she found it too painful and revealing of her inner world and experience, feelings she could not bring herself to share with the public. What is known about her early family life suggests that the intense emotion is autobiographical in origin. This is a stunning work which should be heard, shared and appreciated by all those who value feeling in music.

Raphael and John continue with a performance of the huge Sonata in G minor Op 5 No 2. Here Beethoven is showing off his pianistic and compositional dexterity, structurally daring and technically demanding. The cello displays its full range with, at times, amiable conversations between the instruments and witty passages contrasting with the deeply felt troubled opening.

After the interval the duo continues with Brahms Sonata in F minor Op 120 No 1. This was originally composed for the clarinet (or viola) and piano but Wallfisch and York have made the first and their own arrangement for cello and piano. It is a substantial four movement work which fits so well on the cello, particularly with the heart-breaking second movement. It was written in 1894 three years before Brahms’ death and is one of the very last of his compositions.

The concert ends with Sonata in D minor by Frank Bridge. It is a two movement work composed between 1913 and 1917. The second movement expresses the despair of this avowed pacifist over the futility of the First World War.

This promises to be an exceptionally beautiful recital with the opportunity to hear great music performed by world-class musicians in the intimate surroundings of the music room at Dorstone House. But do remember to bring all your empathy with you! Not-to-be-missed, so do not delay in booking tickets when they come on sale, as those who leave it to the last minute will likely be disappointed.

This concert has been made possible by the support of an anonymous sponsor.

As usual concert goers at Dorstone are invited, weather permitting, to bring a picnic lunch from 1.00 pm and visit the garden and arboretum. Tea and cakes will be available after the performance, provided and served by fund-raising Dorstone volunteers. Signposted car parking is in the field next to Dorstone church.

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