Sep
9
3:00 PM15:00

Fidelio Piano Trio

Dorstone House, Dorstone

Tickets:  £14

Tickets £14 in person from Richard Booth's Bookshop, 44 Lion Street, Hay-on-Wye

or by telephone: 01497 820322

or online through Booth's Bookshop

Please note:  time given for end of concert is approximate.

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Darragh Morgan – violin      Adi Tal - cello      Mary Dullea - piano

 

Programme

Donnacha Dennehy:  Bulb (written for the Fidelio Trio in 2006)

Maurice Ravel:  Piano Trio in A minor  (1914)

Arnold Schoenberg:  Verklärte Nacht  Op. 4 (1899)  (arr for Piano trio by Eduard Steurmenn)

The Musicians:

The …virtuosic Fidelio Trio… (Sunday Times) are Darragh Morgan, violin, Adi Tal, cello and Mary Dullea, piano.  Shortlisted for the 2016 Royal Philharmonic Society Music Awards, the Fidelio Trio are enthusiastic champions of the piano trio genre, performing the widest possible range of repertoire on concert stages across the world; they are broadcast regularly on BBC Radio 3, RTÉ Lyric FM, WNYC, NPR and featured on Sky Arts documentaries; they have an impressive list of commissions and first performances from the leading and newest composers and have a large discography of highly acclaimed recordings.

Since their debut at London’s Southbank Centre, they have appeared at the Wigmore Hall and Kings Place, at festivals from Brighton and Cheltenham to St. Magnus, and from Gregynog to Huddersfield. They regularly perform across the Irish Sea at the National Concert Hall, Dublin, Kilkenny Festival and Belfast Festival at Queens as well as overseas in Shanghai, Porto, Paris, Venice, Florence, Johannesburg, New York City, Princeton, San Francisco and Boston.

Their extensive discography includes Ravel and Saint-Saëns for Resonus Classics; Philip Glass Head On; Korngold and Schoenberg (Verklärte Nacht arr. Steuermann) for Naxos; the complete Michael Nyman Piano Trios for MN Records; multiple releases on NMC, Delphian Records including portrait CDs for composers such as Luke Bedford and Michael Zev Gordon. Their recent release of French Piano Trios for Resonus was a Gramophone Magazine Critic’s Choice.

The Music:

Donnacha Dennehy (b. 1970) is an Irish composer, a product of the hugely dynamic New Music scene in Dublin, more recently moving to join the music faculty at Princeton University. His music is exhilarating and yet evocative, described by the music critic Paul Griffiths as ‘A wonder to hear’.

Composer note:  Bulb was commissioned by the Fidelio Trio with funds provided by the Arts Council of Ireland. It takes as its basis the overtone series built on a very low G, and it grows outwards from a small band of these overtones by means of pulsing glissandi (in the violin and cello). Well in fact these pulsing glissandi are for the most part made of 2 notes (one moving, the other providing a reference drone by its repetitions). By the end, the violin and piano have swapped registral places. It’s an artificial vandalism of a natural phenomenon (the overtone series), like the way electric lighting is of the visual spectrum, or the paintings of Bridget Riley are of various natural perceptions.

Listen to a clip of a performance of Bulb

Dedicated to Ravel's counterpoint teacher André Gedalge, the Piano Trio in A minor is considered one of Ravel’s masterpieces, having immediate sensual appeal, blending with both a skilfully crafted structure and the indescribably fresh voice of Ravel and a new musical era. The trio includes many wonderful details of construction and expression including novelties both exotic and presciently neoclassical.

Listen to them performing the Ravel Trio

Verklärte Nacht (‘Transfigured Night’) is Schoenberg’s most accessible and popular work. It is an emotionally charged interpretation of a poem by Richard Dehmel of the same name. It began life as a string sextet in one movement composed in just three weeks in 1899 and is considered his earliest important work. Schoenberg went on to write a version for String Orchestra but this virtuosic version for Piano Trio was arranged by Eduard Steuermann (a pupil of Shoenberg’s) in 1932.

See and hear the string sextet version of Verklarte Nacht

 

Dorstone House, HR3 6AW, is on the B 4348 6 miles east of Hay. Car parking is in a field next to the church and will be signposted. Concert goers are welcome to come and picnic in the large garden and arboretum from 1.00 pm. After the concert tea and cakes will be provided by Dorstone volunteers raising funds for the Friends of the Church and the Village Hall.

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Oct
7
3:00 PM15:00

Volksrenije Choir from St Petersburg

St Mary's Church, Hay-on-Wye

Tickets:  £12

Tickets £12 (students £6) in person from Richard Booth's Bookshop, 44 Lion Street, Hay-on-Wye

or by telephone: 01497 820322

or online through Booth's Bookshop

Please note:  time given for end of concert is approximate.

 

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A welcome return of this outstanding small choir which has delighted Hay audiences on previous visits with their fine voices and entertaining presentation in a programme of secular and religious music from Russia and elsewhere.
 
The Voskresenije Choir, all internationally trained at the world class St Petersburg Conservatoire and conducted by musical director Jurij Maruk, plan a programme in two parts: the first half concentrates on Russian sacred music including works by Rachmaninov, and, in the second, Russian folk songs allow each of the performers to perform a solo.


Refreshments available during the interval

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Nov
6
7:30 PM19:30

The Amyas Ensemble and Duo Maddalena

St Mary's Church, Hay-on-Wye

Tickets:  £12 (students £6)

Tickets in person from Richard Booth's Bookshop, 44 Lion Street, Hay-on-Wye

or by telephone: 01497 820322

or online through Booth's Bookshop

Please note:  time given for end of concert is approximate.

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Emily Baines - woodwinds

Arngeir Hauksson – lute and percussion
 
Janet Oates – soprano and percussion

 Lucy Green - mezzo soprano and vielle-à-roue

The Amyas Ensemble and Duo Maddalena perform a feast of sacred and secular mediaeval music from England, France and the Netherlands for lute, woodwinds, vielle-á-roue (hurdy-gurdy) and voices.

In this varied selection of instrumental  and vocal music, the Amyas Ensemble and Duo Maddalena recreate the soundscape of mediaeval France, England and Spain. Music by Troubadours and Trobairitz such as the Comtessa Beatrice de Dia, are intertwined with lute-songs by Binchois, up-beat dances by Machaut, a contemporary setting of a Trobairitz poem by Tansy Davies, and a range of serious, humorous and devotional anonymous pieces.
 
Amyas, represented in this concert by Emily Baines (woodwinds) and Arngeir Hauksson (lute, percussion), are a period instrument group specialising in exuberant performances of historical repertoire. They are specialists in historically informed performance, as well as carrying out cutting-edge research into earlier practices. The group are committed to an understanding of history but also to embracing the 21st century and new possibilities for performance spaces and techniques. Similarly, they are passionate both about discovering unknown early sources and also improvisation and composition. Their performances range from the well-loved classics of the eighteenth century (imbued with their typical flair of course!) to electronic manipulation of medieval songs and dances - and everything in between.
 
Duo Maddalena is formed of Janet Oates (soprano, percussion) and Lucy Green (mezzo, hurdy-gurdy). They specialise in three aspects of music, and their interactions: early music, contemporary classical music and music by women composers, offering programmes of entirely mediaeval, renaissance or baroque pieces, entirely newly-composed works or eclectic mixes. For each concert they invite friends and colleagues to join them, providing historically informed accompaniment. They are also interested in new music written for early instruments, and commissioning new works. In and across both earlier and contemporary periods, music by women features in most of their performances, and they enjoy seeking out and arranging or translating little known works.
 
 
Emily Baines is a professional recorder player, lecturer and musical director working throughout Europe also specialising in a wide variety of historical woodwinds. She trained at the University of Hull, the Koninklijk Conservatorium (The Hague) and the Guildhall School of Music and Drama where she recently completed her doctorate on the role of mechanical musical instruments as sources for eighteenth century performance practice. She is a member and co-founder of Blondel (medieval and renaissance wind band), selected in 2016 as one of BBC Radio 3’s ‘Introducing’ acts and who have recently released their second album ‘Owre Kynge Went Forth’, telling the story of Henry V and the battle of Agincourt in words and music. Theatre work has included musician and musical director roles for Jericho House, Barbican BITE, Just Enough Theatre Co., Shakespeare’s Globe and the National Theatre including the Globe’s premier Broadway transfers of Twelfth Night and Richard III in 2013. She has recently finished touring the UK as Musical Director/Band Leader on Jessica Swayle’s Olivier Award winning ‘Nell Gwynn’, following a successful run in London’s West End and concluding with sell-out performances at the Globe. She also lectures on music and Shakespeare’s theatre for the Globe’s education department.
 
Arngeir Hauksson was born in Iceland but came to London for his postgraduate studies on the guitar and the lute at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama. He now specializes in historical plucked instruments from the medieval, renaissance and baroque periods, performing on copies of original instruments. He also plays classical, folk and electric guitars, as well as percussion and the hurdy-gurdy. Arngeir performs and records with many major English ensembles and opera companies. These have included The Sixteen, Ex Cathedra, City Musick, Blondel, Glyndebourne, English National Opera, English Touring Opera, Opera North, the BBC Concert Orchestra and BBC National Orchestra of Wales. He has for 10 years been a principal player and musical director for Shakespeare's Globe Theatre, also performing in the National Theatre, London's West End and on Broadway, New York. He has a keen interest in new music and has collaborated with artists such as Damon Albarn, Sally Beamish, Tony Allen, Bruce Dickinson and William Lyons and he regularly performs in The Historic Royal Palaces, Hampton Court Palace and Tower of London.
 
Janet Oates is interested in early and contemporary music, and in involving the widest possible range of people in a whole spectrum of music-making. She holds a PhD in composition and has composed a chamber opera, a community opera, an oratorio, prize-winning songs and other chamber works. Several of her songs can be found on the recent CD from Divine Arts, called Sappho, Shropshire and SuperTramp. She teaches at Richmond Adult College and conducts several choirs including the experimental contemporary ensemble, CoMA Singers (www.coma.org). She is co-founder of the Richmond New Music Collective and curates the composition project ‘Closet Music’ which has produced two volumes of work and a gallery exhibition. She has sung many lead roles with Isleworth Baroque, as well as performing in solo recitals, oratorio and the professional choir Coro Cervantes. She has premiered works by Tansy Davies, Colin Riley, Greg Rose and others. Janet is one third of The Decibelles, an a capella trio singing jazz, pop and retro songs. Her most recent project is the professional vocal ensemble Philomel, comprising six sopranos singing a combination of late Renaissance works and new commissions, particularly the works of women composers from both these periods.

Lucy Green is a music educationalist whose work bringing the informal learning practices of popular musicians into school classrooms and instrumental studios has reached countries across the world. She is Emerita Professor in Music Education at the UCL Institute of Education in London, and now lives in Hay-on-Wye. She did a B.Ed in Music at Homerton College Cambridge, then a Masters in Music and a Doctorate in Music Education at Sussex University. She holds an LRAM in piano teaching and a DipRSM in vocal performance. Firmly committed to community music in all its incarnations, she was, until moving to Hay, Assistant Musical Director and Stage Director of Richmond Opera, an inclusive group in West London, as well as being involved in a range of other groups. As a singer she concentrates on the early music repertoire. On the stage she has sung the lead in Handel’s Solomon, Juno in Eccles’ The Judgment of Paris, Speranza in Monteverdi’s Orfeo, the Sorceress and spirit in Purcell’s Dido and Aeneus (all with Isleworth Baroque); third lady in Mozart’s Magic Flute (Harrow Opera); the Fairy Queen in Gilbert and Sullivan’s Iolanthe (Richmond Choral Society); and others. She has performed solos from works such as Bach’s Magnificat and St Matthew Passion, Vivaldi’s Gloria, Britten’s Ceremony of Carols, and Handel’s Messiah; and gives regular recitals.

Refreshments available during the interval

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Dec
11
7:30 PM19:30

Elin Manahan-Thomas (soprano) and Elizabeth Kenny (lute and theorbo)

St Mary's Church, Hay-on-Wye

Tickets:  £15 (students £7.50)

Tickets in person from Richard Booth's Bookshop, 44 Lion Street, Hay-on-Wye

or by telephone: 01497 820322

or online through Booth's Bookshop

Please note:  time given for end of concert is approximate.

 

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Elin Manahan Thomas is one of the most exceptional sopranos of her generation.  She has performed at many of the world’s most prestigious venues and festivals and with leading orchestras and conductors. Elin is perhaps most famously known for her performances of baroque masterpieces such as Handel's ‘Eternal Source of Light Divine’ at the London 2012 Paralympics Opening Ceremony and again at the wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle.

 

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Elizabeth Kenny is one of Europe’s leading lute players.  Her playing has been described as “incandescent” (Music and Vision), “radical” (The Independent) and “indecently beautiful” (Toronto Post).  In twenty years of touring she has played with many of the world’s best period instrument groups.

 

'Now Winter Comes Slowly'

A festive programme of wintry favourites featuring scenes from Purcell's Fairy Queen and King Arthur, hymns to the Virgin, celebratory Christmas songs by Bach and Scarlatti and traditional carols and Noels. Elin and Elizabeth's popular alliance will sprinkle some musical magic on a dark winter's night.......

..... featuring scenes from Purcell's Fairy Queen and King Arthur, hymns to the Virgin, celebratory Christmas songs by Bach and Scarlatti and traditional carols and Noels:

Handel:  So shall the lute and harp awake
Monteverdi:  Exulta Filia
Grandi:  O intemerata
Merula:  Canzonetta Spirituale sopra alla nanna
Bach:  Ich freue mich in dir; Ich steh an deiner Krippen hier;  O Jesulein süss
Scarlatt:  Fortunati pastori…Tocco la prima sorte
Campion:  Now winter nights enlarge
Purcell:  Scenes from Fairy Queen and King Arthur
 
Sequence of traditional Christmas songs:

Trad French Noël:  A minuit fut fait un réveil
Trad English:  The truth from above;  Adam lay ybounden;  Gabriel’s message
Trad Welsh:  Cân y Plygain (14’)
Handel:  Or let the merry bells ring round

Refreshments available during the interval

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Aug
12
3:00 PM15:00

Clare Hammond (piano)

Dorstone House, Dorstone

Tickets:  £15

Tickets in person from Richard Booth's Bookshop, 44 Lion Street, Hay-on-Wye

or by telephone: 01497 820322

or online through Booth's Bookshop

Please note:  time given for end of concert is approximate.

Clare Hammond pic.jpg

Hay Music is thrilled to welcome back the outstanding young pianist Clare Hammond who has won friends worldwide with her charm and empathic personality combined with supreme pianistic virtuosity, musical intelligence, and sensitivity. 

Programme:

Haydn:    Sonata No. 58 in C major, Hob XVI: 48

Edmund Finnis:    Youth (2017)

Mendelssohn:   The Bee's Wedding Op. 67, No. 4

Rimsky-Korsakov (arr. Rachmaninov):    Flight of the Bumblebee

Campbell:   Flight of the Killer Bee (2013)

Debussy:   L’Isle Joyeuse

Chopin:   Etudes, Op. 25

Acclaimed as a pianist of “amazing power and panache” (The Telegraph), Clare Hammond is recognised for the virtuosity and authority of her performances and has developed a “reputation for brilliantly imaginative concert programmes” (BBC Music Magazine, ‘Rising Star’). In 2016, she won the Royal Philharmonic Society's 'Young Artist Award' in recognition of outstanding achievements. Highlights that year included a performance at the Royal Festival Hall with the Philharmonia and a series of three concerts at the Belfast International Arts Festival, broadcast as part of the BBC Radio 3 Lunchtime Concerts series. In the 2017/18 season, Clare performed Edwin Roxburgh’s Concerto for Piano and Winds with the BBC Symphony Orchestra under Michael Seal and Panufnik’s Piano Concerto with the Warsaw Philharmonic Orchestra under Jacek Kaspszyk. She has just made the world premiere recording of two keyboard concertos by Myslivecek with the Swedish Chamber Orchestra and conductor Nicholas McGegan for BIS Records. BBC Radio 3 and the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra have co-commissioned composer Kenneth Hesketh to write a concerto for Clare, to be premiered in 2019 with the BBC National Orchestra of Wales. Clare’s most recent disc for BIS, of music by Ken Hesketh, has been widely praised with the Observer describing her as a “star interpreter of contemporary music”. Her previous release, ‘Etude’, received unanimous critical acclaim for its “unfaltering bravura and conviction” (Gramophone) while the BBC Music Magazine stated that “this array of wizardry is not for the faint hearted”.

Clare completed a BA at Cambridge University, where she obtained a double first in music, and undertook doctoral study with Ronan O’Hora at the Guildhall School of Music & Drama and with Professor Rhian Samuel at City University London.

Clare’s programme opens with Haydn’s sonata no 58, a two movement work written in 1789 combining spontaneity with introspection. It is followed by a new work by London based composer Edmund Finnis whose recent works have been described as ‘ethereally beautiful’ New York Times, ingenious….diaphanous…brimming with erotic imagery Herald Scotland. ‘Edmund Finnis is a 34 year old composer who creates glistening, dancing music with an air of diffident mystery. It is mentally tough, often focusing on just a few elements which are carefully weighed and transformed. But the sounds themselves are delicate and glowing, with an intriguing quality of being familiar and strange at once’ The Telegraph, Ivan Hewitt. 

Three short pieces follow on the theme of the flight of bees, Mendelssohn, Rimsky–Korsakov and another young British composer, Ewan Campbell.

After a short interval Clare’s recital continues with Debussy’s Isle Joyeuse (The Island of Joy), probably his happiest, extrovert and most exuberant exciting work.

The concert ends with Chopin’s Opus 25 book of 12 Études. These are a collection of the most beautiful but technically challenging works demanding the very highest pianistic skills. The series ends with what some consider the most thrilling piece of piano writing in the whole classical repertoire!

Dorstone House, HR3 6AW, is on the B4348, 6 miles east of Hay. Car parking is in a field next to the church and will be signposted. Concert goers are welcome to come and picnic in the large garden and arboretum from 1.00 pm. After the concert tea and cakes will be provided by Dorstone volunteers raising funds for the Friends of the Church and the Village Hall.

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